Posts Tagged ‘Singapore’

Who Wants To Be a Millionaire?

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

Wobbly economies that shook up markets in 2011 took their toll on the world’s rich, though fast-growing Asia for the first time had more millionaires than North America.  According to the report, the global personal wealth of people worth $1 million declined in 2011 for the second time in four years, a side effect of the Eurozone crisis and economic sluggishness in developed markets.  Several emerging markets also suffered, with the number of millionaires in India and Hong Kong falling by nearly 20 percent.  With Europe’s debt crisis bedeviling the continent, the outlook for wealth creation in 2012 remains weak, according to a report prepared by Capgemini and RBC Wealth Management.

The world’s millionaires grew by 0.8 percent to a record 11 million, according to the report, yet their collective wealth fell by 1.7 percent to $42 trillion.  Only the Middle East experienced no decline in wealth.  It was the first global decline in millionaire wealth since the 2008 financial crisis, when the ranks of the wealthy fell 15 percent and their wealth declined by 20 percent.

Families worth $30 million or more saw their collective wealth fall 4.9 percent and their ranks shrink by 2.5 percent to just 100,000 individuals.  This decline reflects holdings in higher-risk and less liquid investments like hedge funds, private equity and real estate.

“It was a challenging environment for our clients,” George Lewis, global head of wealth management at Royal Bank of Canada, said.  The Toronto banking giant began sponsoring the widely watched report in May.  Lewis pointed out that the number of high net worth individuals rose even as overall wealth fell.  “It at least suggests there continues to be upward mobility and the ability to generate wealth around the world,” he said.

Curious about how many millionaires live in nations around the world?  Read this:  Singapore toppled Hong Kong as home to Asia’s wealthiest in 2011 as declining stock markets hit the former British territory significantly harder than its Southeast Asian rival.  Hong Kong, whose stock market capitalization fell by 16.7 percent last year, saw a bigger decline in the ranks of people with more than $1 million to invest as a larger proportion of that wealth was tied up in equity.  Southeast Asia also has shown stronger signs of resilience to global turmoil than the rest of Asia as domestic spending offset struggling exports.  The number of millionaires in Hong Kong fell 17.4 percent to 83,600 last year, compared with a decline of 7.8 percent to 91,200 people in Singapore, according to RBC Wealth’s head of emerging markets Barend Janssens.  Hong Kong took the lead from Singapore in 2010 after falling behind in 2008.

China still is home to the most high net worth individuals in Asia Pacific, with a population of 562,000 millionaires.  The top five countries by population of high net worth individuals are the US (3.07 million), Japan (1.82 million), Germany (951,000), China and the United Kingdom (441,000).  According to RBC, this significant concentration of high net worth individuals is why wealth managers are attracted to Asia even if they have to contend with competition from domestic banks.

Are the troubles in the Eurozone likely to impact Asia?  Lessons learned from the 2008 financial meltdown show that while Asia tends to get hit when the world economy stumbles, the severity varies depending on which countries have the biggest trade and financial linkages, and are best-prepared with big currency reserves, overflowing government coffers and central banks with the ability to cut interest rates.  Generally speaking, Asia has more room than the West to react with interest-rate cuts and government spending.  But some things have changed since 2008, and some countries, primarily India, Vietnam and Japan, may not be in shape to survive another financial jolt.  “As we saw with Lehman, when you get a seizure in the global financial system, nobody can hide from that in the short run,” said Richard Jerram, chief economist at the Bank of Singapore.  In that type scenario — which analysts say could still occur if Greece doesn’t live up to its commitments and leaves the Euro, or Spain and Italy require a bailout that Europe can’t afford — Asian stocks and currencies would fall, shipping lanes would see less business, and lending to consumers and businesses would dry up, slowing world economies.

World Bank Head Predicts No “Double-Dip” Recession

Wednesday, September 28th, 2011

World Bank President Robert Zoellick believes the world will not slide into a double-dip recession. Zoellick was in Singapore, attending an economic conference amid plummeting world stock prices and worries over a slowdown in U.S. economic growth.  Zoellick believes the United States and the world will avoid a “double-dip” recession, but admitted that growth is likely to remain sluggish and prospects are uncertain.  Zoellick said the world is entering a “dangerous period,” noting that the United States could reassure markets with steps to put the brakes on increasing its debt, rather than making deep cuts in spending.

Zoellick’s comments add pressure on European officials who are trying to contain a sovereign debt crisis that threatens Italy, whose government bonds in euros have declined a record 11 consecutive days.  Finland has fostered division among policy makers by looking for collateral for loans to Greece, the first of the three euro-region nations to receive bailouts so far.  American and European economies are stalling and feeble global growth are impacting Asia, Singapore’s Minister of Finance Tharman Shanmugaratnam said.  Growth in the U.S. and Europe may be just one percent.

“We’re already at stall speed in the U.S. and Europe, which means we’re now more likely than not to see a recession,” Shanmugaratnam said.  Companies are holding back spending and consumers globally lack confidence.  Zoellick tamped down the likelihood of a “double-dip” global recession in comments to reporters in Singapore today.   Still, “we are now seeing a particularly sensitive time in the euro zone,” the World Bank chief said.  “A number of issues are converging.”

“These things are very hard to predict because if you have events trigger uncertainty in Europe, that will flow back to the U.S.,” Zoellick said.  The eurozone’s performance “depends on the political decisions moving forward,” he said.  The euro will survive in the next five years, although the question over membership of the common currency is one that Europeans must answer.  “Sometimes people hope that you can muddle through by providing financing and liquidity, in the case of Europe, from the European Financial Stability Facility or the European Central Bank,” Zoellick said.  “They now recognize that’s not going to happen and instead what you see is with some of the weaker economies, that the austerity policies are pushing them into slower and slower growth and so this could be a downward spiral.”

According to Zoellick, recent European Central Bank government bond purchases have given temporary monetary liquidity to markets.  “The policies that have been pursued by the EU up to now can buy time, but parliaments and the public have to come to terms with fundamental questions,” Zoellick said.  One direction is to deepen the fiscal union.”

“They’ve tried to pump money into it, they’ve tried in the past month.  The ECB bought a lot of bonds.  But, I think dealing with these problems through liquidity measures will not be sufficient,” Zoellick said.  “Christine Lagarde of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and I from a different position at the World Bank have been trying to prod people to recognize some of these questions.”  Lagarde, who told the Federal Reserve’s annual conference that European banks need urgent capitalization, angered some European policymakers and politicians with her opinions.

“People should not underestimate the European response, but Europeans should not be fooled that that type of response will deal with the fundamental questions that still need to be addressed,” Zoellick said.  The markets have been hoping for additional monetary stimulus from the Federal Reserve to relieve global growth concerns, but Zoellick said that monetary policy alone won’t do the job.  Rather, he said, the real solution to Europe’s crisis must be found to deal with the crisis.  “This one is really even beyond the finance ministers’ pay grade.  These are going to be the decisions that have to be made by the heads of government and supported by their parliaments,” he said.

American markets analyst Peter Kenny of Knight Capital said “We have a eurozone that is an apoplectic frenzy of just trying to right the ship.  If you can find some stabilizing influence in the eurozone to give the global markets some confidence, I’d be shocked.”  Parliaments in Germany and France currently debating the extent of their countries’ contribution to the European Financial Stability Facility, the fund set up to bail out any eurozone nations struggling with their debt obligations.

Richard Jeffrey, chief investment officer at Cazenove Capital Management, said that “Money that the key worry for the markets was the health of the world economy.  “If the world economy is slowing down or perhaps even moving into recession – I think that is less likely, but that is what people fear – then that has negative implications for the financial system and the banking sector.  The debt problems in the peripheral European economies rumble on, of course, but again their debt problems are helped if there is growth.  If there isn’t growth in the economies, then their debt problems become more difficult to support, so this is all interlinked.”

Up In the Sky! It’s 2010’s Best Tall Buildings

Monday, July 19th, 2010

The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat recognizes 2010’s best tall buildings.  The Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) recently announced the finalists for its 2010 “Best Tall Building” awards.  The annual awards recognize exceptional tall buildings from each of four geographical regions and are chosen for their design and technical innovations, sustainable attributes, and the enhancement they provide to their cities and the inhabitants.

The 55-story Bank of America Tower in New York was hailed for its commitment to sustainability, which has made human health and corporate responsibility a priority.  Its exceptionally high indoor environmental quality results from hospital-grade, 95 percent filtered air; abundant natural daylight; an under-floor ventilation system; and views through floor-to-ceiling glass curtain wall.

This 51-story Pinnacle at Duxton includes 1,848 public housing units in central Singapore. It redefines urban high-density living by weaving continuous Sky Gardens on the 26th and 50th stories through the seven tower blocks.  Multiple access points to the Sky Gardens also mean that they are an ideal evacuation strategy.  Because they are connected, the seven tower blocks share three sets of water tanks and pumps and one building maintenance unit.

A key design element of the 23-story Broadcasting Place in Leeds, England, is the irregular elevations, tailored to optimize daylight and reduce solar penetration. An innovative analysis calculates the optimum quantity and distribution of glazing/shading at all points on the façade to ensure high levels of natural day lighting but without overheating.

The unprecedented height of Dubai’s 163-story Burj Khalifa required rethinking design techniques, building systems, and construction practices to create a practical and efficient tower. The building’s shape references regional architecture in the pointed ends of the “Y” which are reminiscent of Islamic archways.  As the tapering tower rises, setbacks occur at the end bay of each wing in an upward spiraling pattern that decreases the tower’s mass as the height increases.  These setbacks minimize wind forces.

The best tall building of 2010 will be announced at the CTBUH’s awards ceremony in October.

Foreign Governments Paying Cash for Pricey Manhattan Real Estate

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

Foreign governments are snapping up prime Manhattan real estate for consulates, U.N. offices.Foreign governments are a growth engine for New York City commercial and residential real estate at a time when many cash-strapped European nations are facing financial crises.  For example, Sri Lanka’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations has $8 million to spend and is looking at Manhattan office space.  Laos recently paid $4.2 million in cash for a five-story townhouse in the Murray Hill neighborhood.  Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Anton Troianovski notes that “Even the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country – Haiti – was gearing up to bid on a Second Avenue office condominium when the earthquake struck and derailed its plans.”

Foreign governments “are almost the only game in town,” according to Ken Krasnow, managing director with Massey Knakal.  During the boom years, foreign governments looking to buy real estate for consulates and U.N. missions found stiff competition from private developers.  Since last year, however, Senegal, Singapore, South Korea and the United Arab Emirates have purchased prime properties for redevelopment.  Additionally, governments are paying top dollar – usually in cash – for office space or land sites that are within walking distance of the United Nations.  Troianovski notes that “This trend underscores the bench strength of New York real estate:  When certain buying groups move to the sidelines, others are waiting to take their place.”

Dealing with foreign governments means that the transaction typically progresses at a glacial pace.  Philips International spent three years in negotiations with the Ivory Coast to close on an $8 million office condominium at 800 Second Avenue.  The transaction, which closed last September, spent 377 days in escrow.