Posts Tagged ‘RealtyTrac’

Foreclosures Decline, But Expect a Spike Thanks to Banks Settlement

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Foreclosure filings declined eight percent in February, the smallest year-over-year decrease since October 2010, as lenders began working through a backlog of seized properties, according to RealtyTrac Inc. A total of 206,900 homes received notices of default, auction or repossession last month, down two percent from January, according to the data firm, which noted that one in every 637 households received a filing.  Those numbers could rise sharply in coming months.

Banks slowed foreclosures for more than a year as attorneys general in every state investigated charges of shoddy and incomplete paperwork.  A $25 billion settlement with the five largest lenders removed some roadblocks to property seizures and gave the go-ahead for future actions, Brandon Moore, RealtyTrac’s chief executive officer, said.  “February’s numbers point to a gradually rising foreclosure tide.  That should result in more states posting annual increases in the coming months.”

“The pig is starting to move through the python,” said Daren Blomquist, RealtyTrac’s director of marketing.  The banks “have already adjusted their foreclosure practices to fit the terms of the settlement.  We expect that to continue as (the settlement) gets finalized,” Blomquist said.

The settlement clarifies the way in which foreclosures must be handled.  That is expected to let banks speed up their processing, putting many delinquent homeowners into the foreclosure process.  Cases could move forward after being on hold for months — even years — with their delinquent owners still living illegally in the properties.

“The foreclosure and mortgage settlement filed in court earlier this week will help pave the way to a properly functioning foreclosure process by providing a clear roadmap for necessary foreclosures,” Moore continued.  “That should result in more states posting annual increases in the coming months.  Not surprisingly, many of the biggest annual increases in February were in states with the more bureaucratic judicial foreclosure process, which resulted in a larger backlog of foreclosures built up over the last 18 months in those states.”

Cities with the highest foreclosure rates were Riverside-San Bernardino in California (one in 166 housing units); Atlanta (one in 244); Phoenix (one in 259); Miami (one in 264); and Chicago (one in 302).

The Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Office of the Inspector General’s report found that several banks violated servicing standards and foreclosure procedures and engaged in extensive robo signing.  The banks agreed to follow new servicing standards and offer relief to borrowers by providing $10 billion in principal reductions, $3 billion in refinancing loans and $7 billion in alternatives to foreclosure.  Foreclosures in the 26 states with a judicial foreclosure process rose 24 percent over last year, while activity in the 24 states that follow a non-judicial foreclosure process fell by 23 percent

Default notices, the initial step in the foreclosure process increased more than 20 percent in 12 states, including Hawaii, Maryland, Connecticut, South Carolina, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Florida.  State attorneys general have filed lawsuits against major lenders in New York, California and Nevada in recent months, further slowing the pace of foreclosures in those states.

Home Delinquencies Fall; Foreclosures Rise

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Fewer borrowers currently are delinquent on their home loans, a Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) report shows.  Curiously, new foreclosures are rising in states like California.  This is evidence that the nation still must endure significant pain before the housing crisis finally comes to an end.  According to some analysts, the nation is only halfway through the wrenching grip of the foreclosure epidemic.  That’s reflected in the housing market, where sales and prices continue to sag despite record low interest rates.  Five years after the crisis began, 7.99 percent of all mortgages were behind by at least one payment in the 3rd quarter but not yet in foreclosure.  Nevertheless, that’s down by nearly half a percentage point from the 2nd quarter and more than one percent when compared with last year.

The percentage of American mortgages that were somewhere in the foreclosure process at the end of the 3rd quarter was 4.43 percent, a slight increase over last year.  The rate of homes in foreclosure was highest in the East and Midwest that route residential repossessions through the courts, with Florida at more than 14 percent and New Jersey at eight percent.

Rather surprisingly, new foreclosures rose to 1.08 percent of all loans from 0.96 percent in the prior three months, according to the MBA. The rate had been declining since the 3rd quarter of 2010, when regulators began investigating robo-signing.  Some of the nation’s largest banks temporarily halted foreclosures while they addressed claims of flaws in their court documents.  The moratoriums clogged the entire foreclosure pipeline as banks investigated their procedures, said Patrick Newport, an economist at IHS Global Insight.  “Banks are starting to speed up the process now that they’ve cleaned up their paperwork,” Newport said.  “We’re seeing the backlog begin to move.”

Unfortunately, the improvement may be short lived.  For the 4th quarter, the pace probably will slow to 2.3 percent, according to the median estimate among 86 economists surveyed by Bloomberg.  The pace likely will slow to two percent in the first three months of 2012, according to the estimates.  “While the delinquency picture changed for the better in the 3rd quarter, the foreclosure data indicated that we are not out of the woods yet and that the issues continue to vary by geography,” Michael Fratantoni, the Mortgage Bankers Association’s vice president of research and economics, said.

“That’s really just reflecting the modest improvement we’ve seen in the economy broadly and the job market in particular,” Fratantoni said. “Job growth is not what we want it to be, but it’s been good enough to keep the unemployment rate at least level and that’s been beneficial here with fewer people falling behind.”

“While foreclosure activity in September and the 3rd quarter continued to register well below levels from a year ago, there is evidence that this temporary downward trend is about to change direction, with foreclosure activity slowly beginning to ramp back up,” said James Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac.  “Third quarter foreclosure activity increased marginally from the previous quarter, breaking a trend of three consecutive quarterly decreases that started in the fourth quarter of 2010,” according to Saccacio.  “This marginal increase in overall foreclosure activity was fueled by a 14 percent jump in new default notices, indicating that lenders are cautiously throwing more wood into the foreclosure fireplace after spending months trying to clear the chimney of sloppily filed foreclosures.”

Foreclosure were filed on 214,855 U.S. properties in September, a six percent decrease from August and a 38 percent decrease when compared with September of 2010.  September marked the 12th consecutive month where foreclosure activity decreased on a year-over-year basis.

A report issued by the Center for Responsible Lending found that 6.4 percent of mortgages created between 2004 and 2008 ended in foreclosure.  Another 8.3 percent of mortgages are at “immediate, serious risk.”  According to Fratantoni, “Given the pace of foreclosure sales — about one million foreclosure sales a year — it’s a three- or four-year process to get it back to a more typical level of foreclosed properties.”

The refinance share of mortgage activity fell to 77.3 percent of total applications from 78.6 percent the previous week.  The adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) share of activity increased to 6.1 percent from 5.8 percent of all applications.  In October, 50.6 percent of refinancing applications opted for fixed-rate 30-year loans, 28.8 percent opted for 15-year fixed loans and six percent went with ARMs.  In terms of applications for home purchase mortgages, 85.5 percent were for fixed-rate 30-year loans, 6.9 percent for 15-year fixed loans and 5.9 percent for ARMs, the lowest share of that vehicle for purchases since January.

August Foreclosures Rise 33 Percent Over July

Tuesday, October 11th, 2011

Default notices sent to delinquent U.S. homeowners soared 33 percent in August when compared with July, evidence that lenders are accelerating the foreclosure process after almost one year of delays, according to RealtyTrac, Inc.  First-time default notices were filed on 78,880 homes, the highest number in nine months.  Total foreclosure filings, which also include auction and home-seizure notices, rose seven percent from a four-year low in July to 228,098.  One in 570 homes received a notice during August.  “The industry appears to be hitting the reset button and the logjam may finally be breaking up,” Rick Sharga, RealtyTrac senior vice president, said.  Foreclosure filings in 2011 have been “artificially low.”

“This is really the first time we’ve seen a significant increase in the number of new foreclosure actions,” Sharga said. “It’s still possible this is a blip, but I think it’s much more likely we’re seeing the beginning of a trend here.”  Foreclosure activity started declining last year after problems surfaced with the way many lenders were handling foreclosure paperwork, such as shoddy mortgage paperwork comprising several shortcuts known as robo-signing.

Additional factors have also stalled the pace of new foreclosures.  In some cases, the process has been held delayed by courts in states where judges are involved in the foreclosure process, a possible settlement of government investigations into mortgage-lending practices, and lenders’ reluctance to take back properties because of slowing home sales.  A rise in foreclosures also means a potentially faster turnaround for the U.S. housing market.  Experts say that revival won’t occur as long as the glut of potential foreclosures remains on the market. 

Foreclosures depress home values and create uncertainty among potential homebuyers who worry that prices may further decline as more foreclosures hit the market.  There are approximately 3.7 million more homes in some phase of foreclosure at present than there would be in a normal housing market, according to Citi analyst Josh Levin.  “This bloated foreclosure pipeline now presents the greatest obstacle to a housing market recovery,” he said.

Although negotiations between some banks and state attorneys general regarding foreclosure practices are still unresolved, several restarted foreclosure actions after an April settlement with federal regulators.  JPMorgan Chase & Co., as of the end of June, had resumed foreclosure actions in nearly all of the 43 states where it had suspended its efforts.  So-called “shadow inventory,” or the looming foreclosures that are still expected to hit the market, is a major threat for a housing sector that already has a glut of unsold homes.  In spite of everything, default notices had fallen 18 percent when compared with August of 2010 and down 44 percent from the peak reached in April 2009 during the tail end of the recession.

Writing for The Consumerist website, Chris Morran says that “Last year, several of the country’s largest mortgage servicers — Bank of America, GMAC/Ally, JPMorgan Chase, among others — were forced to hit the pause button on foreclosure procedures after it was revealed that many foreclosure documents were being rubber stamped by untrained, ill-informed ‘robo-signers.’  This delay caused a bottleneck of foreclosure-worthy properties waiting to be reviewed.  But now it looks like those homes are starting to trickle out into what could be a flood in early 2012.  According to Bank of America, “We are on an ongoing path to return foreclosures to normal levels. Strong gains like that from July to August demonstrate our progress – primarily in judicial states — clearing more volume to advance to foreclosure once we pass the numerous quality controls we have in place and exhaust all options with homeowners.  Our progress each month builds upon foreclosure levels lower than the market realities would dictate.”

A more optimistic view of the dismal report was offered by Gregory Tsujimoto, who performs market research for John Burns Real Estate Consulting in Irvine, CA, and views the data as reflecting more of a stall in an improving market than a new downtrend.  Despite the sharp increase in monthly figures, Tsujimoto attaches more weight to an 18 percent decline in default notices on a yearly basis.  Tsujimoto believes that the uptick in default notices is “a leading indicator for future foreclosures, which is not coming at a great time when measures of consumer confidence have declined.”  But, he says that we must address the backlog of distressed inventory and “vacant homes in the marketplace before we get true improvement.”  The other key, he says, is “creating jobs to spur demand.”

Among the states with the highest foreclosure rates, California led in new foreclosures with an increase of 55 percent over July, according to RealtyTrac.  Cities in inland California posted big jumps, with Riverside and San Bernardino counties soaring 68 percent, Bakersfield 44 percent and Modesto 57 percent.  “Scratch beneath the surface and there’s not a lot to cheer about this month.  Home sales were up from a year earlier but remained far below average,” DataQuick President John Walsh said.  “Many would-be buyers can’t find financing, and others who want to make a move now are stuck because they owe more than their homes are worth.”

The decision to move ahead is an important one since RealtyTrac has long maintained that property values won’t rise until a large number of distressed properties are purchased.  “We don’t know yet if this is a beginning of a trend, but there is a good chance we might see a return to more realistic foreclosure numbers,” Sharga concluded.

Foreclosures Appear to Be Stabilizing

Monday, August 29th, 2011

Foreclosure filings fell a dramatic 35 percent in July to the lowest level in nearly four years as lenders and state and federal agencies ramped up their efforts to keep delinquent borrowers in their homes, according to RealtyTrac Inc.  A total of 212,764 properties received default, auction or repossession notices, the lowest number in 44 months.  Filings declined on a year- over-year basis for the 10th consecutive month, and were down four percent when compared with June.  One in every 611 households across the country received a notice.  “The downward trend in foreclosure activity has now taken on a life of its own,” RealtyTrac Chief Executive Officer James J. Saccacio said.  “Unfortunately, the fall-off in foreclosures is not based on a robust recovery in the housing market but on short-term interventions and delays that will extend the current housing market woes into 2012 and beyond.  It appears that processing delays, combined with the smorgasbord of national and state-level foreclosure prevention efforts, may be allowing more distressed homeowners to stave off foreclosure.” 

Nevada leads the nation with the highest foreclosure rate of any state, one filing for every 115 homes.  California, with one foreclosure for every 239 homes came in second, while Arizona, with one in every 273 homes, was third.  Las Vegas continued to record the nation’s highest foreclosure rate, with one in every 99 homes getting a foreclosure filing in July. 

Foreclosure auctions, the final step in the agonizing foreclosure process were also scheduled on five percent fewer properties in July.  The month’s auction total hit a three-year low and was nearly half (46 percent) below the March, 2010, peak.  An estimated four million vacant homes not yet accounted for by lenders constitute an immense inventory of residential properties, approximately 2.2-million of which are in default and have not yet been formally foreclosed known as the “shadow inventory” weigh down the marketplace. 

The Obama administration is proactively seeking ways to dispose of foreclosed homes that are under government control.  The goal is to “bring stability and liquidity” to the housing market, Edward J. DeMarco, acting director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), said.  The FHFA regulates Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which guarantee approximately 90 percent of American mortgages.  President Obama has proposed a program to encourage the rental of foreclosed homes owned by the Federal Housing Administration, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac.  Banks could adopt similar programs and offer homes at steep discounts to get residential real estate off their books.  Financial institutions typically get lucrative write-offs from these and so might prefer to rent some properties.  Other federal attempts to prop up the housing market have not been successful to date.  The Making Home Affordable Program operation was launched in March of 2009 with the main component the Home Affordable Modification Program.  This was created to cut mortgage payments for families who couldn’t afford them, but wanted to keep their houses.  A Congressional Oversight Panel report said the programs had failed and fell far short of its goal to modify mortgages for three million to four million homes.  The new Obama plan to rent foreclosed homes has the potential to positively impact home prices.

Writing on MSNBC, John W. Schoen says that “A sharp slowdown in the pace of home foreclosures may help ease the financial burden on bankers by helping them unload a glut of repossessed homes more slowly and delay booking losses from the sale of distressed properties.  But it will do little to help millions of Americans families at risk of being tossed from their homes in the next few years.  The slowdown follows a wave of legal challenges by homeowners that has all but shut down the machinery of bank repossession in some states.  Some homeowners are disputing the widespread practice of ‘robo-signing’, in which lenders process batches of foreclosure fillings with little or no formal review.  Other homeowners have successfully halted repossessions by questioning shoddy paperwork or broken paper trails that don’t establish clear title to a property.  The slowdown has left millions of American households in legal limbo, prolonged the housing market’s four-year recession and delayed hopes for a broader economic recovery.” 

“The process has more or less ground to a halt in a lot of states that do foreclosures through the court system,” said Rick Sharga, a senior vice president at RealtyTrac.

Foreclosed Homes Total a Three-Year Supply

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

The current national inventory of foreclosed homes represents a three-year supply, according to RealtyTrac.  Not surprisingly, that is depressing home prices.  “This is very bad for the economy,” said Rick Sharga, a RealtyTrac spokesman.

In Las Vegas, the foreclosure situation is so dire that more than half of all homes sold in Nevada are foreclosures.  In California and Arizona, 45 percent of sales are foreclosures; that totals 28 percent of all existing home sales during the 1st quarter of 2011.

Additionally, the nation’s stock of foreclosed homes are selling at deep discounts, particularly REOS, which are bank-owned homes.  The typical REO sold for about 35 percent less than comparable properties, according to RealtyTrac.  In some areas, the discounts were ever steeper: In New York, the discount for REOs was 53 percent during the 1st quarter and almost 50 percent in Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

“Short sales,” homes where the selling price is less than what is owed by the borrowers, are also dragging down the market.  These sell for an average nine percent discount.  When you consider both REOs and short sales, Ohio had the biggest discount of any state, at 41 percent.

During the 1st quarter, there were 158,000 sales involving distressed properties nationally, less than half the nearly 350,000 during the same period of 2009.  With the slower pace of sales, it will take three years to sell off the inventory of 1.9 million distressed properties, according to Sharga.  “Even if you look at REOs alone, it will take 24 months to clear them and that’s without any new foreclosures at all coming into the system,” he said.

RealtyTrac found that the average sales price of properties in some stage of foreclosure, scheduled for auction or bank-owned — was $168,321, down 1.89 percent from the 4th quarter of 2010.

A total of 158,434 bank-owned homes and those in some stage of foreclosure were purchased during the 1st quarter, a 16 percent decline from the 4th quarter of last year and down 36 percent from the 1st quarter 2010 total.  Bank-owned properties that sold in the 1st quarter had been repossessed an average of 176 days before the sale, while properties that sold in earlier stages of foreclosure in the 1st quarter were in foreclosure an average of 228 days before they were sold.  According to James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac, “While this is probably helping to keep home prices relatively stable, it is also delaying the housing recovery.  At the first quarter foreclosure sales pace, it would take exactly three years to clear the current inventory of 1.9 million properties already on the banks’ books, or in foreclosure.”

Foreclosures are particularly attractive to all-cash buyers who demand discounts,  pushing down the value of all properties.  More than 75 percent of American cities experienced price declines in the 1st quarter.  Bank-owned homes totaled 107,143 sales in the 1st quarter, down 11 percent from the 4th quarter and almost 30 percent from 2010.  Sales of homes in default or scheduled for auction totaled 51,291, a 26 percent decline, according to RealtyTrac.  That was less than half the peak of 348,629 distressed deals in the 1st quarter of 2009.

Writing on the website 24/7wallstreet.com,  Douglas A. McIntyer offers an interesting perspective.  “Any economist will say that when some homes are sold at 27 percent below the normal market, all home prices will be pulled lower.  That may be the key to the home market recovery.  Foreclosure inventory will continue to rise as banks put more backlogged homes onto the market.  The glut will probably push down the average of all homes by several percent. This may be a reason home prices are predicted to fall another 10 percent this year.  Buyers will not come back to the housing market until they believe that prices are too good to resist.  That may mean homes that sold for $500,000 in 2005 will have to sell for $300,000 next year.  Prices will not be driven down quickly without the reduction in inventory of foreclosed homes.  There has to be a bottom to prices.  The sooner it is found the better.  The housing market is more than half dead.  The only tonic is a belief by buyers that prices are so remarkably low that new buyers will make money on a house and not lose it.  If the housing market is to continue to drop, the drop needs to be swift.  Mortgage rates are near all-time lows.  Inflation and concerns about the value of Treasuries due to the U.S. national deficit could change that.  Home prices that are viewed as affordable need to be married with low mortgage rates for the market to catch fire.”

Foreclosures Are Down, So Why Isn’t That Good News?

Tuesday, June 7th, 2011

There’s good news and bad news about foreclosures.  Although the number of foreclosures fell to their lowest rate in 4 ½ years in April, the reason is a delay in processing the orders, not because Americans are experiencing less trouble paying their mortgages.  “Foreclosure activity decreased on an annual basis for the seventh straight month in April, bringing foreclosure activity to a 40-month low,” James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of foreclosure data company RealtyTrac, said.  “This slowdown continues to be largely the result of massive delays in processing foreclosures rather than the result of a housing recovery that is lifting people out of foreclosure.”

According to Saccacio, “The first delay occurs between delinquency and foreclosure, when lenders and services are no longer automatically pushing loans that are more than 90 days delinquent into foreclosure but are waiting longer to allow for loan modifications, short sales and possibly other disposition alternatives.  Data from the Mortgage Bankers Association shows that about 3.7 million properties are in this seriously delinquent stage.  The second delay occurs after foreclosure has started, when lenders are taking much longer than they were just a few years ago to complete the foreclosure process.”

Nationally, homes typically are taking 400 days to go from the initial default notice to bank repossession, an increase when compared with 340 days a year earlier and 151 days in the 1st quarter of 2007, RealtyTrac said.

According to RealtyTrac’s report,  219,258 American homes were involved in the foreclosure process in April, either having received a notice of default, been scheduled for auction or been repossessed.  This is nine percent less than from March and a 34 percent cut from April 2010.  The report also shows one in every 593 American homes received a foreclosure filing during April 2011.  In New York, it took a property 900 days to go through the process.  In Florida, it was 619 days and in California, 330 days.

Nevada tops the list of states for foreclosures in proportion to its population, with one out of every 97 homes receiving a foreclosure filing in April.  Arizona ranked second.  Although Arizona foreclosures fell 15 percent,  REOs (bank repossessions) rose 22 percent, keeping the state in second place for the fifth consecutive month.  One in every 205 homes received a foreclosure filing.  Similarly, a 22 percent jump in REOs kept California in third place for a sixth month despite a decline in activity, with one in every 240 units affected during the month.  Other states in the top five are Utah (one of every 322) and Idaho (one of every 325).

Just ten states account for 70 percent of all foreclosure activity.  The first two in terms of numbers of foreclosures, California with 55,869 filings and Florida with 19,649 and the fourth, Michigan with 12,996, have large populations.  Arizona and Nevada, with relatively small populations rank in the top five by virtue of numbers as well as foreclosure rate with 13,419 filings and 11,761 filings.  The next five states with the greatest number of foreclosures are Illinois, Texas, Georgia, Ohio, and Colorado.

Writing in The Atlantic, Daniel Indiviglio notes that “It’s hard to see how this is good news for the housing market.  Prices are likely falling more slowly since the foreclosures aren’t hitting the market as quickly as they should be.  But they cannot be held up artificially — the decline will just happen over a longer period of time instead of quickly and steeply.  That means it will take longer for the housing market to hit its true bottom.  Only when that occurs can a recovery begin.  In other words, banks’ failure to process foreclosures in a timely manner will prolong the housing market’s struggles.”

Illinois Ranks Dead Last in List of Retirement Paradises

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

retirement_imageIllinois ranks as the nation’s worst state to retire in,  according to a study by TopRetirement.com. The nine other losers include California, New York, Rhode Island, New Jersey, Ohio, Wisconsin, Massachusetts, Connecticut and Nevada.  John Brady, TopRetirement.com’s president, says the 10 states belong on this list because of their fiscal health (poor), taxation (high) and climate (the majority have cold, snowy winters).  The Pew Center for States has described six of the 10 as being in “fiscal peril”.  These states include Arizona, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Nevada, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, Wisconsin and California.

Illinois’ position at the bottom of the list is due to the state’s grim fiscal health, which Brady describes as possibly the worst of any state.  The report, entitled “Beyond California:  States in Fiscal Peril”, demonstrates that “some of the same pressures that have pushed California toward economic disaster are wreaking havoc in a number of other states, with potentially damaging consequences for the entire county.”  Regarding Illinois, Brady notes that “It even borrowed money to fund its pension obligations.”  In terms of California, Brady notes that although it has an enviable climate, the cost of living is expensive and the state’s finances are a shambles – even paying some bills with vouchers.  Although New York state’s finances are in fairly good condition, it has the nation’s second-highest tax burden and the fifth-highest property taxes, as well as a “dysfunctional state legislature.”

One surprising finding was that – despite its affordable housing prices, due in part to a high number of foreclosures – Nevada was deemed the 10th worst state for retirement.  As the nation’s home foreclosure capital, Nevada in 2010 saw one in every 79 homes in foreclosure,  according to RealtyTrac.  Although Brady admits that the state has some financial problems, the positive news for retirees is that Nevada does not have a state income tax.

“Every individual has to consider his or her own criteria for selecting a list of the worst or best states to retire,” Brady concluded.