Posts Tagged ‘national debt’

Foreclosed Homes Total a Three-Year Supply

Tuesday, June 14th, 2011

The current national inventory of foreclosed homes represents a three-year supply, according to RealtyTrac.  Not surprisingly, that is depressing home prices.  “This is very bad for the economy,” said Rick Sharga, a RealtyTrac spokesman.

In Las Vegas, the foreclosure situation is so dire that more than half of all homes sold in Nevada are foreclosures.  In California and Arizona, 45 percent of sales are foreclosures; that totals 28 percent of all existing home sales during the 1st quarter of 2011.

Additionally, the nation’s stock of foreclosed homes are selling at deep discounts, particularly REOS, which are bank-owned homes.  The typical REO sold for about 35 percent less than comparable properties, according to RealtyTrac.  In some areas, the discounts were ever steeper: In New York, the discount for REOs was 53 percent during the 1st quarter and almost 50 percent in Illinois, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

“Short sales,” homes where the selling price is less than what is owed by the borrowers, are also dragging down the market.  These sell for an average nine percent discount.  When you consider both REOs and short sales, Ohio had the biggest discount of any state, at 41 percent.

During the 1st quarter, there were 158,000 sales involving distressed properties nationally, less than half the nearly 350,000 during the same period of 2009.  With the slower pace of sales, it will take three years to sell off the inventory of 1.9 million distressed properties, according to Sharga.  “Even if you look at REOs alone, it will take 24 months to clear them and that’s without any new foreclosures at all coming into the system,” he said.

RealtyTrac found that the average sales price of properties in some stage of foreclosure, scheduled for auction or bank-owned — was $168,321, down 1.89 percent from the 4th quarter of 2010.

A total of 158,434 bank-owned homes and those in some stage of foreclosure were purchased during the 1st quarter, a 16 percent decline from the 4th quarter of last year and down 36 percent from the 1st quarter 2010 total.  Bank-owned properties that sold in the 1st quarter had been repossessed an average of 176 days before the sale, while properties that sold in earlier stages of foreclosure in the 1st quarter were in foreclosure an average of 228 days before they were sold.  According to James J. Saccacio, chief executive officer of RealtyTrac, “While this is probably helping to keep home prices relatively stable, it is also delaying the housing recovery.  At the first quarter foreclosure sales pace, it would take exactly three years to clear the current inventory of 1.9 million properties already on the banks’ books, or in foreclosure.”

Foreclosures are particularly attractive to all-cash buyers who demand discounts,  pushing down the value of all properties.  More than 75 percent of American cities experienced price declines in the 1st quarter.  Bank-owned homes totaled 107,143 sales in the 1st quarter, down 11 percent from the 4th quarter and almost 30 percent from 2010.  Sales of homes in default or scheduled for auction totaled 51,291, a 26 percent decline, according to RealtyTrac.  That was less than half the peak of 348,629 distressed deals in the 1st quarter of 2009.

Writing on the website 24/7wallstreet.com,  Douglas A. McIntyer offers an interesting perspective.  “Any economist will say that when some homes are sold at 27 percent below the normal market, all home prices will be pulled lower.  That may be the key to the home market recovery.  Foreclosure inventory will continue to rise as banks put more backlogged homes onto the market.  The glut will probably push down the average of all homes by several percent. This may be a reason home prices are predicted to fall another 10 percent this year.  Buyers will not come back to the housing market until they believe that prices are too good to resist.  That may mean homes that sold for $500,000 in 2005 will have to sell for $300,000 next year.  Prices will not be driven down quickly without the reduction in inventory of foreclosed homes.  There has to be a bottom to prices.  The sooner it is found the better.  The housing market is more than half dead.  The only tonic is a belief by buyers that prices are so remarkably low that new buyers will make money on a house and not lose it.  If the housing market is to continue to drop, the drop needs to be swift.  Mortgage rates are near all-time lows.  Inflation and concerns about the value of Treasuries due to the U.S. national deficit could change that.  Home prices that are viewed as affordable need to be married with low mortgage rates for the market to catch fire.”

Want to Buy a Toxic Asset? The Treasury Department Is Selling Them

Monday, April 18th, 2011

The Treasury Department is planning to sell $142 billion worth of toxic assets that it acquired during the financial crisis.  According to Treasury, it wants to sell approximately $10 million worth of assets every month, depending on market conditions and hopes to end the program next year.  Treasury acquired the securities — primarily 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage-backed securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac –between October, 2008 and December, 2009 to stabilize the home loan market.

The Treasury has decided to sell the securities now because the market has “notably improved.”  According to Treasury officials, the sale could net $15 billion to $20 billion in profits for taxpayers.  The sale will have a negligible impact on the U.S. debt limit but could delay the ceiling’s arrival by a few days.  In early March, Treasury estimated the U.S. would hit the $14.294 trillion ceiling between April 15 and May 31.  The Treasury in 2008 retained State Street Global Advisors, a leading institutional asset manager, to acquire, manage and dispose of the mortgage-backed securities portfolio.

“We will exit this investment at a gradual and orderly pace to maximize the recovery of taxpayer dollars and help protect the process of repair of the housing finance market, Mary Miller, assistant secretary for financial markets, said.  “We’re continuing to wind down the emergency programs that were put in place in 2008 and 2009 to help restore market stability, and the sale of these securities is consistent with that effort.”

Congress gave Treasury the authority to buy securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.  The value of these mortgage-backed securities declined significantly after the housing bubble burst, prompting fears that write-downs could drag down individual banks and further plunge the financial system into panic.  The Treasury said that three years after the worst point of the crisis, the market for asset-backed derivatives is now much more robust.

The government bought $221 billion of these bonds, as part of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008.  Treasury announced that it would buy the bonds on the day the government took over Fannie and Freddie.  “The primary objectives of this portfolio will be to promote market stability, ensure mortgage availability, and protect the taxpayer,” Treasury said at the time.  The portfolio is now just $142 billion.  The Congressional Oversight Panel, which supervised the Troubled Asset Relief Program, said that as of February of 2011, Treasury had received $84 billion in principal repayments and $16.7 billion in interest on the securities it holds.

“It was a bit of a surprise, though will likely be easy to digest,said Tom Tucci, head of government bond trading at Capital Markets in New York.  “We spent a year and a half at levels that were unsustainable because they weren’t based on economic fundamentals, they were based on fear.  “Now some of the fundamentals are starting to come back into place.”

Republicans are asking for deeper cuts in government spending before they will agree to raise the debt limit.  Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner has cautioned that failure to raise the borrowing limit would cause an unparalleled default by the government on the national debt.  Without question, this would drive up the government’s cost of borrowing money.

How Do You Solve a Problem Like TARP?

Wednesday, December 16th, 2009

The Obama Administration is giving serious thought to the best use of the remaining funds that are part of the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) financial bailout. The President – under pressure to bring down the deficit that has grown as the government seeks to reverse the economic crisis — is considering using a significant amount of the leftover funds to reduce the national debt.The government is considering how to spend $139 billion in remaining TARP funds.

Approximately $139 billion of the $700 billion financial bailout program passed last year remains unspent and available to the Treasury Department.  Financial institutions have returned approximately $71 billion in TARP funds to the government and paid an additional $10 billion in interest and dividends to the Treasury Department.  The struggling economy and high unemployment rates are the impetus for paying down nearly $200 billion of the $12 trillion national debt.

Some Democrats in Congress think that unspent TARP funds should be used as an antidote to rising unemployment.  According to Representative John B. Larson (D-CT), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, lawmakers could send a strong message about their priorities by using TARP funds to pay for road and bridge projects and other efforts that will create jobs.  “We want to look at how Wall Street can refund Main Street,” Larson said, noting that he and other senior House Democrats are considering a tax on financial transactions.  One possible use of unspent TARP funds could be payouts to small business programs to jump start job growth.