Posts Tagged ‘Mary Schapiro’

House Republicans Want to Water Down Dodd-Frank Financial Reforms

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Republican congressmen searching for sizeable spending cuts are targeting Wall Street’s regulators over a plan to slash millions from the budgets of several vital agencies. They are setting their sights on the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  The workload of both agencies is expected to increase significantly as the Dodd-Frank financial reform law is implemented. House Republicans want to slash the CFTC’s funding by $56.8 million – nearly 33 percent of the agency’s entire budget — over the next seven months.  The SEC’s funding would be cut by $25 million over the same time.

CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler said he would have no option but to reduce his staff from 680 to fewer than 440 if the cuts are approved.  “We’d have to have significant curtailment of our staff and resources,” Gensler said.  “We would not be able to police…or ensure transparent markets in futures or swaps.”  Under Dodd-Frank, the CFTC regulates the multi-trillion dollar derivatives market that includes over-the-counter products called credit default swaps.  The story is similar at the SEC, which is working to augment its enforcement of Dodd-Frank.  “It (budget cuts) will have a very real effect on the SEC’s ability, not just with respect to Dodd-Frank implementation, but also with respect to our core mission,” SEC Chairman Mary Schapiro said in testimony before Congress.

Leading the charge in Congress is Representative Randy Neugebauer, chairman of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. One of Neugebauer’s top priorities is assuring that regulators are not “overreaching” and moving too quickly with their new authorities under Dodd-Frank.  Neugebauer expressed concern about whether regulators are adequately performing cost-benefit analyses on every rule in Dodd-Frank, a process required under federal rule-making procedures.  He expects to call SEC Chairman Schapiro and CFTC Chairman Gensler back to testify about the issue, especially since he believes that Gensler gave him “vague” responses about cost-benefit analyses on derivatives rules.  Neugebauer said another of his major priorities will be to rein in the powers of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, an entity created under Dodd-Frank.  The Texas congressman wants to move the bureau to the Treasury Department and out of the Federal Reserve’s control.

Another congressional Republican makes this point.  “When the House and Senate passed the Dodd-Frank Act, supporters continually purported that small financial institutions, like many I represent, were exempt,” Representative Shelley Moore Capito, (R-WV) said.  “As the provisions of Dodd-Frank are going through the rule making process, I am starting to hear concerns from small institutions about the unintended consequences that could adversely affect them.”

One point of contention with the Republicans is the orderly liquidation provision that authorizes regulators to seize large financial institutions that are about to fail and dismantle them in a way that is less disruptive than either taxpayer bailouts or bankruptcy.

“People are saying we won’t have the guts” to invoke orderly liquidation, acknowledged Democratic Representative Barney Frank, (D-MA), who co-sponsored the legislation with now-retired Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT).  “Well, we had the guts with regard to the TARP to get the money back.  We got it back,” he said, referencing the $700-billion Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) that bailed out Wall Street firms and which has been largely repaid.  “I don’t have any question that we’re going to go through with it,” Frank said.

Republicans May Underfund Dodd-Frank Implementation

Thursday, January 20th, 2011

Republicans May Underfund Dodd-Frank ImplementationPresident Barack Obama’s crackdown on Wall Street excesses could be hampered if the incoming Republican-controlled Congress refuses to fund two crucial regulatory agencies.  The Dodd-Frank financial reform law – passed with heavy Democratic support – promised a generous budget to regulate the $600 trillion over-the-counter derivatives market.  Now, the law’s implementation may be derailed by the incoming 112th Congress.  Randy Neugebauer (R-TX), who will chair the House Financial Services oversight subcommittee, wants to review the regulators’ expansion plans.  “Once you turn the money loose, it’s a little harder to stop that train,” he said.

The two regulatory agencies in question are the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC).  The SEC, for example, had expected to receive an 18 percent increase to its 2011 budget, which would have allowed it to hire 800 new regulators to enforce Dodd-Frank.  Roadblocks are on the horizon, however, in the form of Representative Spencer Bachus (R-AL), who will chair the House Financial Services Committee, and Frank Lucas (R-OK), who will chair the agricultural committee that oversees the CFTC.  The two Congressmen wrote to regulators, saying “An overarching concern…is the need to get it done right, not necessarily get it done quickly.”  The Republicans’ attitude to enforcing Dodd-Frank could be a boon to Wall Street firms, whose lobbyists are advocating a go-slow approach.

Mary Schapiro, SEC Chairman, said “We will have to take some more steps to cut back.  At this stage, it will impact our work.”  The chronically underfunded and understaffed CFTC, which had expected a 50 percent budget increase, had planned to hire 240 new regulators this year to enforce its new oversight of the swaps market.  According to CFTC Chairman Gary Gensler, “I do think without sufficient funding next summer (2011) you’d see a significant number of registrants – swap dealers, swap execution facilities and so forth – whose legitimate applications would have to be slowed down.  Michael Greenberger, a University of Maryland law professor and previously the CTFC’s director of trading and markets, says.