Posts Tagged ‘Long Beach’

Inland Empire Poised for Industrial Comeback

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009

Over the past decade, California’s Inland Empire has been transformed from a little-known region with affordable housing and lots of inexpensive land into an industrial hub – thanks to its proximity to the busy Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.  With the City of Ontario embarking on The Ontario Plan, sciearmalogo2city fathers are laying the groundwork for increased investment over the next 30 to 40 years.  The plan’s goal is to create an all-inclusive community where people and businesses will want to be.

According to Mary Jane Olhasso, economic development director for the City of Ontario, “Although firms are pulling back, they still realize that the region has competitive advantages over our coastal neighbors.  In Ontario, both industrial and office lease rates are lower than Los Angeles and Orange County.”

The Inland Empire’s industrial market is in a prime position to recover when the economy improves because the region is notable for its relatively low-cost housing, large workforce and vital location relative to international shipping.  With 40 percent of all containerized cargo entering the United States through Southern California ports, the Inland Empire is the logical location for gigantic distribution centers to handle the freight prior to shipping it throughout the United States.

No Port in the Global Fiscal Storm

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2009

Shipping activity has plunged as much as one-third at U.S. ports most heavily invested in the once red-hot but now declining Asia trade. 

Freight rates from South China to Europe have slid as much as 42 percent from some ports since November, leading shipping industry authority Drewry Container Freight Rate Insight Report to speculate that this once-robust market is in freefall.titanic-sinking-7790481

As freight rates fall to record lows shipping companies are playing hardball to remain competitive, even though relatively little product is being shipped these days.  According to Drewry, container lines could see a $68 billion plunge in global revenues this year, compared with 2008 revenues of $220 billion.  Drewry notes that global all-in freight rates fell to $1,681 per 40-foot box, down from $2,098 in November.  That’s a steep $400 drop per feu (forty-foot equivalent unit) or 20 percent in just two months.

The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are slashing cargo rates to retain old customers and attract whatever new business they can.  Spanning 10,000 acres, these vast ports typically handle $357 billion in goods every year.  The ripple effect of this year’s overall 18.1 percent downturn is evident in California’s vital Inland Empire logistics market, where higher vacancy rates – now approaching nine percent — are translating to cheaper rents.

Conditions are slightly better at the East Coast ports of New York and New Jersey, because their diverse mix of trading partners include Asia, Europe, Latin America and South America.

High Costs Could Impact Shipping Routes

Wednesday, September 24th, 2008

Two trends in international trade worth highlighting:

American exports are booming, thanks to the dollar’s current weakness.  This considerable increase in volume has made it virtually impossible for U.S. manufacturers to get space on container ships within a four-week window, especially for products shipping from the ports of Los Angeles or Long Beach to any Pacific Rim destination.  To illustrate the scope of the change, container space from these ports was available on demand just one year ago.  And, according to a recent Reuters article, waiting times for cargo space have jumped from two days to three weeks on the East Coast.

Fast-rising transportation costs that are a direct result of the cost of fuel is another important logistics trend – one that could negatively impact globalization.  According to an August 2 article in the International Herald Tribune by Larry Rohter, shipping a single loaded 40-foot container from Shanghai to the United States has soared to as much as $8,000 per unit, compared with just $3,000 earlier in the decade.  Additionally, there are cost add-ons, primarily in the form of fuel surcharges and government-mandated fees.  To save on fuel costs, container ships have shaved their top speeds by nearly 20 percent, which means it takes longer for products to reach their intended markets.

Shipping to and from Prince Rupert in British Columbia is slightly less costly, because the distance to Asian ports is shorter than from Los Angeles or Long Beach.  Still, space amounts to several thousand dollars per container.

“If prices stay at these levels, that could lead to some significant rearrangement of production, among sectors and countries,” said C. Fred Bergsten, author of The United States and the World Economy and a director of the Peter G. Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington.  “You could have a very significant shock to traditional consumption patterns and also some important growth effects.”

A far better alternative could be to ship to and from Asia from the southern border regions, where the going rate is approximately $800 per loaded container.  That price differential could potentially lure companies to move production facilities to Mexico or the Southwestern United States – primarily Texas.  This would give them the opportunity to leverage the more attractive shipping rates through the growing Mexican ports of Lazaro Cardenas and Punto Colonet.