Posts Tagged ‘foreign buyers’

Chicago Economists Say 2009 Is a Year of Challenge

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009

The economic forecast for 2009 is bleak, although it’s possible that recovery will begin mid-year. This is the opinion of William Strauss and Rick Mattoon, senior economists with the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago. “We are predicting that 2008 will yield real GDP of 0.2 percent and that 2009 will be 0.7 percent,” Strauss said. “This will be the slowest two-year growth period since 1981 – 1982, an 18-month recession that will be deeper than the 2000 and 1990 – 1991 recessions.”

Although some economists believe that the unemployment rate will hit double digits this year, Strauss and Mattoon optimistically predict that it will level off at approximately nine percent. Real income growth will be flat, and might even decline. The key to recovery is a thaw in the credit markets so that their performance improves.

Trade is holding its own; exports are still in positive territory. Strauss warns, however, that exports can’t be relied upon to drive to the economy, because the global recession means that foreign buyers will purchase less than they previously did.

Given their relative optimism, I wonder if Strauss and Mattoon agree with President Obama, who warned that failure to pass his $800 billion economic recovery package “could turn a crisis into a catastrophe”? Considering the bad review that Wall Street gave to Treasury Secretary Geithner’s preliminary plans for the use of the remaining $350 million of TARP money, it will be interesting to see how the markets react to the House-Senate conference committee’s compromise bill.

Economy Grows 3.3 Percent During 2Q

Wednesday, September 3rd, 2008

Contrary to the recent grim news about home foreclosures, bank failures, the credit crunch, rising unemployment rates, soaring oil prices, inflation and stock-market jitters, the United States’ economy — surprisingly — grew by 3.3 percent during the second quarter of 2008.

The economy grew at its fastest pace in nearly a year, thanks primarily to foreign buyers purchasing inexpensive U.S. exports, as well as the tax rebates that sent Americans on a shopping spree.

According to Commerce Department statistics, the GDP increased at a 3.3 annual rate from April through June.  This revised statistic represents a significant improvement over the initial 1.9 percent estimate, and exceeded economists’ expectations of a 2.7 percent growth rate.

The rebound was welcome news after two grim quarters.  The economy contracted during the last three months of 2007, and registered a feeble 0.9 percent growth rate during the 1st quarter of 2008.  Spring’s 3.3 percent performance was the best result since the third quarter of 2007, when the economy grew by an impressive 4.8 percent.

Still, the good news is something of a fluke.  The economy is still quite fragile, according to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke, who recently warned that the weakness will remain throughout 2008.  Analysts expect the economy to hit another pothole during the 4th quarter, once the glow of the tax rebates dims.  Additionally, exports could decline if other nations experience similarly slowing economies.

Add presidential politics into the mix.  Democratic nominee Barack Obama favors a second government-stimulus package, while Republican John McCain supports free trade and other business measures to energize the economy.  With less than two months remaining until the election, the candidates are certain to have a lot more to say on how they plan to energize the economy.