Posts Tagged ‘Double-dip recession’

Britain Slides Into Double-Dip Recession

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Europe’s financial woes have spread across the English Channel as the United Kingdom slid into its first double-dip recession since the 1970s. Britain’s GDP fell 0.2 percent from the 4th quarter of 2011, when it declined 0.3 percent, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS).

As anti-austerity backlash grows on the Continent, Prime Minister David Cameron said the data was “disappointing” and promised to shore up growth without backtracking on the UK’s biggest fiscal squeeze since World War II.  “I don’t seek to excuse them, I don’t seek to try to explain them away,” Cameron said.  “There is no complacency at all in this government in dealing with what is a very tough situation, which frankly has just got tougher.”  Cameron said “We have got to rebalance our economy.  We need a bigger private sector.  We need more exports, more investment.  This is painstaking, difficult work but we will stick to our plans, stick with low interest rates and do everything we can to boost growth, competitiveness and jobs in our country.”

Opposition leader Ed Miliband said the figures are “catastrophic” and asked Cameron why this had happened.  “This is a recession made by him and the chancellor in Downing Street.  It is his catastrophic economic policy that has landed us back in recession,” Miliband said.

The Bank of England is in the last month of economic stimulus and the fall-off in output comes as prospects dim in the Eurozone, Britain’s biggest export market.  “This isn’t supportive of the fiscal consolidation program, so the government is likely to be concerned about that,” said Philip Rush, an economist at Nomura International in London.  “The data were bad, and that supports the view that the Bank of England will do a final £25 billion of quantitative easing in May.”

According to ONS, output in the production industries decreased by 0.4 percent; construction fell by three percent.  Output of the services sector, which includes retail, increased by 0.1 percent.  The decline in government spending contributed to the particularly large fall in the construction sector.  “The huge cuts to public spending – 25 percent in public sector housing and 24 percent in public non-housing and further 10 percent cuts to both anticipated for 2013 — have left a hole too big for other sectors to fill,” said Judy Lowe, deputy chairman of industry body CITB-ConstructionSkills, said.

The UK’s last double-dip recession, defined as consecutive quarterly drops in GDP, was in 1975. At that time, Labour Prime Minister Harold Wilson was in office and Margaret Thatcher was elected leader of the opposition Conservatives.  UK Treasury forecasters and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) believe the economy will grow 0.8 percent this year, the same as last year.  According to Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne, the UK’s economic situation is “very tough” and the government should stick to its plans of eliminating a majority of the deficit by 2017.  “The one thing that would make the situation even worse would be to abandon our credible plan and deliberately add more borrowing and even more debt.  It’s taking longer than anyone hoped to recover from the biggest debt crisis of our lifetime,” Osborne said. “The one thing that would make the situation even worse would be to abandon our credible plan and deliberately add more borrowing and even more debt.”

Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit, said: “The underlying strength of the economy is probably much more robust than these data suggest.  The danger is that these gloomy data deliver a fatal blow to the fragile revival of consumer and business confidence seen so far this year, harming the recovery and even sending the country back into a real recession.”

Not everyone agrees that the data indicates a double-dip recession.  Writing in the Telegraph, Philip Aldrick says that “Economists have been questioning the reliability of the ONS numbers for a while now, but the latest data drew the debate sharply into focus.  At -0.2 percent, the GDP reading was considerably worse than the consensus of 0.1 percent growth.  The ‘discrepancy’, as Goldman Sachs’ Kevin Daly described it, was ‘unbelievable’ because much of the recent survey data – from the Bank of England’s agents’ reports to the purchasing managers’ indices – have been encouraging.  Andrew Goodwin of the Ernst & Young ITEM Club agreed.  ‘Our reaction is one of disbelief,’ he said.  ‘The divergence is virtually unprecedented and must raise significant question marks over the quality of the data.’  They are not alone.  No lesser institution than the Bank of England has queried the ONS data.  Last week, minutes to the Monetary Policy Committee meeting damningly noted: ‘The sharp falls in construction output in December and January were perplexing, and the Committee was minded not to place much weight on them.”

Let’s Go Shopping!

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

Despite rising gas prices, retail sales in the U.S. rose 0.8 percent in March, proof that consumers are still filling up their tanks, according to economists.  The rise in purchases follows a 1.1 percent increased in February that was the biggest in five months, according to a survey of 71 economists.  The gain sent retail sales to a record high of $411.1 billion, 24 percent higher than the recession low hit in March 2009.  “Retail sales are going to end the quarter on a positive note,” said Ryan Sweet, a senior economist at Moody’s Analytics Inc.  “Underlying job growth is decent.”

Sales may have been helped by the unusually warm weather. The average temperature was 51.1 degrees Fahrenheit, the warmest on record for the month in the past 117 years, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  The economy expanded “at a modest to moderate pace” from mid-February through late March as manufacturing, hiring and retail sales strengthened, according to the Federal Reserve’s latest Beige Book report.  The central bank is maintaining its benchmark interest rate near zero until late 2014 to encourage economic expansion.

Americans spent more on building materials, cars, electronics, furniture and clothing in March.  A separate Department of Commerce report showed that American companies restocked at a steady pace in February, which suggests that businesses expect consumers to continue spending this spring.  The retail sales report is the government’s initial monthly look at consumer spending, which represents 70 percent of economic activity.  The increase, along with other positive data on inventories and trade, suggests growth in the January-March quarter could be stronger than first thought.  Economists are estimating growth at an annual rate of between 2.5 percent and three percent in the 1st quarter, which is in line with the annual pace reported for the October-December quarter.  Americans are feeling greater confidence in the economy after seeing hiring strengthen over the winter.  Job gains were typically 246,000 per month from December through February.

In terms of cars, “The industry and consumers have been very resilient in the face of higher pump prices,” Don Johnson, vice president of U.S. sales at General Motors, said.  “The steadily improving economy is playing a role and so is pent-up demand and an improved credit market.”

Corporate stockpiles rose a seasonally adjusted 0.6 percent, according to the Commerce Department. That’s less than January’s upwardly revised gain of 0.8 percent. The increase pushed stockpiles to $1.58 trillion which is nearly 20 percent more than the recent low hit in September 2009, just after the recession ended. Sales grew faster than inventories in February, rising 0.7 percent.  This is a good sign because it is evidence that companies aren’t building too much inventory, which can result in cutbacks in production in the future.

“The pace of inventory building is consistent with what you’d expect to see in a gradual expansion,” said Tim Quinlan, an economist at Wells Fargo.  Businesses are rebuilding their stockpiles after cutting them over the summer in fear of a double-dip recession.  Steady inventory growth in the 1st quarter, as well as a narrower trade deficit in February and stronger retail sales, has lifted the outlook for growth.

American households “have the income to propel their purchases now that we’re seeing job growth,” said Russell Price, senior economist at Ameriprise Financial Inc., the third- best forecaster of retail sales for the 24 months ended in March.  “They have adjusted to the higher price of fuel.  The economy now needs to build on its own momentum.”

Rising Unemployment Could Push Eurozone Into a Double-Dip Recession

Wednesday, April 18th, 2012

Europe’s unemployment has soared to 10.8 percent, the highest rate in more than 14 years as companies from Spain to Italy eliminated jobs to weather the region’s crisis, according to the European Union’s (EU) statistics office.  That’s the highest since June 1997, before the Euro was introduced.  European companies are cutting costs and eliminating jobs after draconian austerity measures slashed consumer demand and pushed economies from Greece to Ireland into recession.

According to Eurostat, the number of unemployed totaled 17.1 million, nearly 1.5 million higher than in 2011.  The figures stand in marked contrast to the United States, which has seen solid increases in employment over the past few months.  “It looks odds-on that Eurozone GDP contracted again in the first quarter of 2012….thereby moving into recession,” said Howard Archer, chief European economist at IHS Global Insight.  “And the prospects for the second quarter of 2012 currently hardly look rosy.”

The North-South divide is evident, with the nations reporting the lowest unemployment rates being Austria with 4.2 percent; the Netherlands at 4.9 percent; Luxembourg at 5.2 percent; and Germany at 5.7 percent.  Unemployment is highest among young people, with 20 percent of those under 25 looking for work in the Eurozone, primarily in the southern nations.  The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, defended the debt-fighting strategy, insisting that reforms undertaken by governments are crucial and will ultimately bear fruit.  “We must combat the crisis in all its fronts,” Amadeu Altafaj, the commission’s economic affairs spokesman, said, stressing that growth policies are part of the strategy.

According to Markit, a financing information company, Germany and France, the Eurozone’s two powerhouse economies, saw manufacturing activity levels deteriorate.  France fared the worst with activity at a 33-month low of 46.7 on a scale where anything below 50 indicates a contracting economy.  Only Austria and Ireland saw their output increase.

Spain, whose government recently announced new austerity measures, had the Eurozone’s highest unemployment rate at 23.6 percent; youth unemployment — those under 25 years of age — was 50.5 percent.  Greece, Portugal and Ireland — the three countries that have received bailouts — had unemployment rates of 21 percent, 15 percent and 14.7 percent respectively.

With unemployment rising at a time of austerity, consumers have stopped spending and that holds back the Eurozone economy despite signs of life elsewhere.  “Soaring unemployment is clearly adding to the pressure on household incomes from aggressive fiscal tightening in the region’s periphery,” said Jennifer McKeown, senior European economist at Capital Economics.  She fears that the situation will worsen and that even in Germany, where unemployment held steady at 5.7 percent, “survey measures of hiring point to a downturn to come.”

The numbers are likely to worsen even more. “We expect it to go higher, to reach 11 percent by the end of the year,” said Raphael Brun-Aguerre, an economist at JP Morgan in London.  “You have public sector job cuts, income going down, weak consumption.  The economic growth outlook is negative and is going to worsen unemployment.”

Writing for the Value Walk website, Matt Rego says that “By the looks of it, Europe could be heading for a recession very soon.  If the GDP contracts this 1st quarter of 2012, they will most likely be in a double dip.  Those are some pretty scary numbers and forecasts because they would send economic aftershocks around the world.  If Europe goes into a double dip and U.S. corporate margins do peak, we could be looking at trouble.  If you are a ‘super bull’ right now, I would reconsider because we are walking the line for both factors coming true and there really is nothing we can do, the damage is done.  Could we have seen all of the year’s gains in the beginning of this year?  Probably not but this European recession scare would certainly trigger a correction in the U.S. markets.  Bottom line, get some protection for your portfolio.  Buy stocks that aren’t influenced by economic times and buy protection for stocks that would react harshly to a double dip.”

Economic Indicators Showing Signs of Life

Wednesday, January 11th, 2012

Leading economic indicators (LEI) rose 0.9 percent in October, a sign that the U.S. economy is likely to see accelerated growth and not slip into a feared double-dip recession.  According to The Conference Board, its index of leading economic indicators rose significantly faster than the revised 0.1 percent rise in September and the 0.3 percent increase in August.  After growing at an anemic pace of just 0.9 percent in the first six months of 2011, the economy grew 2.5 percent in the July – September quarter.  Some analysts are looking for even stronger growth in the 4th quarter.

Economists said the October gain and other positive reports recently should ease fears that the nation is in danger of slipping into a double-dip recession.  According to Conference Board economist Ken Goldstein, the latest leading indicators report was pointing “to continued growth this winter, possibly even gaining a little momentum by spring.”

The leading economic indicators is a subjective gauge of 10 indicators designed to signal business cycle highs and lows.  Among the 10 indicators, nine made positive contributions in October, led by building permits, the interest-rate spread, and average weekly manufacturing hours.  The sole negative contribution came from faster supplier deliveries.

Increases in consumer spending, manufacturing and homebuilding — along with fewer job losses — highlight an economy that is weathering the turbulence in financial markets caused by the European debt crisis.  Even so, a nine percent unemployment rate and political gridlock over deficit-cutting are hurting confidence, which may hamper a further pickup in the pace of growth.  “The economy looks to be getting better despite the continued drumbeat of negativity in financial markets,” said Joseph LaVorgna, chief U.S. economist at Deutsche Bank Securities Inc., who accurately forecast the gain.  “That speaks to U.S. resiliency.  If we can put some of these fiscal issues behind us, even for a short period of time, we might be able to come back.”

Another positive sign can be found in the University of Michigan’s six-month index of consumer expectations which rose to 56.2 in November, a five-month high, compared with 51.8 in October.  A word of caution — the measure remains below the 80.5 average of the previous expansion that ended in December 2007.

October’s results suggest strong ongoing economic activity, said Millan Mulraine, TD Securities’ economics strategist.  “On the whole, this report underscores the positive tone of the recent flow of economic reports pointing to a meaningful pick-up in overall economic activity during the quarter,” Mulraine said.  “And while the economy remains vulnerable to missteps in Europe and Washington, there is every indication that the recovery is slowly moving into the clear, building on the momentum from the last quarter.”

According to Ataman Ozyildirim, an economist at The Conference Board, “The October rebound of the LEI — largely due to the sharp pick-up in housing permits — suggests that the risk of an economic downturn has receded. Improving consumer expectations, stock markets, and labor market indicators also contributed to this month’s gain in the LEI as did the continuing positive contributions from the interest rate spread.  The Coincident Economic Index also rose somewhat, led by higher industrial production and employment.”

World Bank Head Predicts No “Double-Dip” Recession

Wednesday, September 28th, 2011

World Bank President Robert Zoellick believes the world will not slide into a double-dip recession. Zoellick was in Singapore, attending an economic conference amid plummeting world stock prices and worries over a slowdown in U.S. economic growth.  Zoellick believes the United States and the world will avoid a “double-dip” recession, but admitted that growth is likely to remain sluggish and prospects are uncertain.  Zoellick said the world is entering a “dangerous period,” noting that the United States could reassure markets with steps to put the brakes on increasing its debt, rather than making deep cuts in spending.

Zoellick’s comments add pressure on European officials who are trying to contain a sovereign debt crisis that threatens Italy, whose government bonds in euros have declined a record 11 consecutive days.  Finland has fostered division among policy makers by looking for collateral for loans to Greece, the first of the three euro-region nations to receive bailouts so far.  American and European economies are stalling and feeble global growth are impacting Asia, Singapore’s Minister of Finance Tharman Shanmugaratnam said.  Growth in the U.S. and Europe may be just one percent.

“We’re already at stall speed in the U.S. and Europe, which means we’re now more likely than not to see a recession,” Shanmugaratnam said.  Companies are holding back spending and consumers globally lack confidence.  Zoellick tamped down the likelihood of a “double-dip” global recession in comments to reporters in Singapore today.   Still, “we are now seeing a particularly sensitive time in the euro zone,” the World Bank chief said.  “A number of issues are converging.”

“These things are very hard to predict because if you have events trigger uncertainty in Europe, that will flow back to the U.S.,” Zoellick said.  The eurozone’s performance “depends on the political decisions moving forward,” he said.  The euro will survive in the next five years, although the question over membership of the common currency is one that Europeans must answer.  “Sometimes people hope that you can muddle through by providing financing and liquidity, in the case of Europe, from the European Financial Stability Facility or the European Central Bank,” Zoellick said.  “They now recognize that’s not going to happen and instead what you see is with some of the weaker economies, that the austerity policies are pushing them into slower and slower growth and so this could be a downward spiral.”

According to Zoellick, recent European Central Bank government bond purchases have given temporary monetary liquidity to markets.  “The policies that have been pursued by the EU up to now can buy time, but parliaments and the public have to come to terms with fundamental questions,” Zoellick said.  One direction is to deepen the fiscal union.”

“They’ve tried to pump money into it, they’ve tried in the past month.  The ECB bought a lot of bonds.  But, I think dealing with these problems through liquidity measures will not be sufficient,” Zoellick said.  “Christine Lagarde of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and I from a different position at the World Bank have been trying to prod people to recognize some of these questions.”  Lagarde, who told the Federal Reserve’s annual conference that European banks need urgent capitalization, angered some European policymakers and politicians with her opinions.

“People should not underestimate the European response, but Europeans should not be fooled that that type of response will deal with the fundamental questions that still need to be addressed,” Zoellick said.  The markets have been hoping for additional monetary stimulus from the Federal Reserve to relieve global growth concerns, but Zoellick said that monetary policy alone won’t do the job.  Rather, he said, the real solution to Europe’s crisis must be found to deal with the crisis.  “This one is really even beyond the finance ministers’ pay grade.  These are going to be the decisions that have to be made by the heads of government and supported by their parliaments,” he said.

American markets analyst Peter Kenny of Knight Capital said “We have a eurozone that is an apoplectic frenzy of just trying to right the ship.  If you can find some stabilizing influence in the eurozone to give the global markets some confidence, I’d be shocked.”  Parliaments in Germany and France currently debating the extent of their countries’ contribution to the European Financial Stability Facility, the fund set up to bail out any eurozone nations struggling with their debt obligations.

Richard Jeffrey, chief investment officer at Cazenove Capital Management, said that “Money that the key worry for the markets was the health of the world economy.  “If the world economy is slowing down or perhaps even moving into recession – I think that is less likely, but that is what people fear – then that has negative implications for the financial system and the banking sector.  The debt problems in the peripheral European economies rumble on, of course, but again their debt problems are helped if there is growth.  If there isn’t growth in the economies, then their debt problems become more difficult to support, so this is all interlinked.”

The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy?

Monday, September 26th, 2011

Mark Zandi of Moody’s Analytics, who often discusses the economy, recently said something disturbing and fascinating about the possibility of a double-dip recession.  According to Zandi, it could be the only recession that we will ourselves into.   Zandi was talking about gloomy expectations that make people so nervous that in terms of economics, they freeze.  His remarks are a reminder that while we regularly report economic data – unemployment, cost of living, home prices, trade deficits – there are other measures of our economy that are, by definition, subjective.  Do we feel secure?  Do we have confidence in the future to the point where we’re willing to spend money and take risks?

According to Dennis Jacobe of the Gallup Organization, “We’re a lot less confident than we normally are. Three out of four right now will say the economy is getting worse.  And that’s a number that approximates the numbers of late 2008.  I think the American people don’t see the economy that most of us economists and the public policymakers see.  Americans see high unemployment rates and are concerned about losing their job.  They’re concerned about higher food prices and higher energy prices, even though we say that there’s not much inflation.  They’re worried about the housing market.  And then on top of that, they’re worried about things like politics and the confrontational kind of stalemate in D.C. 

“That certainly had an impact according to our numbers,” according to Jacobe.  And what we see happening over the last several weeks is interesting in the sense that the average American, middle and lower income American, has been fairly pessimistic for quite a while with all these things that have been bothering them.  But what we’ve seen happen recently is that things like the confrontation over the debt ceiling bill and on other kinds of things seem to have troubled upper-income Americans.  Now, they’re also affected by what’s happening on Wall Street and what’s happening internationally with the problems in Europe and those kind of things, but when upper-income people also get very pessimistic, that’s when our numbers get up to three-quarters or 80 percent of Americans being worried. 

“There really isn’t.  And, you know, I think that one of the things that’s happening is that we’re not paying enough attention to consumer psychology as opposed to Wall Street and investor psychology.  People all the time talk about how that affects Wall Street and how when Europe has had financial problems, they thought – people thought back to 2008 and the financial crisis and all those kind of things.  But the average American is affected by the same kind of thing.  They saw tremendous financial shock in 2008 and early 2009.  And they saw that in their lives and in terms of not only credit access, but also in terms of their jobs and their job security.  And I think people forget that when a lot of these things happen, like the budget confrontation, that that brings back memories of those days and those troubles.  And that has a major impact on consumer psychology.  So the statement like Zandi made makes a lot of sense in the sense that consumers actually are impacted today differently than, say, in years past,” Jacobe said.

“The trouble is people are so shell-shocked and haven’t really gotten over the recession,” according to Zandi.  “They’re extraordinarily nervous, and when anything goes off script even a little bit they freeze, and that’s where we are right now and why we are so close to recession.”

In discussing the recent Standard & Poor’s downgrade of the United States’ credit rating from AAA to AA+, Zandi believes that there is a logical apprehension that a financial market selloff could feed on itself, doing real economic damage if it drags on.  Wary households might respond by cutting back on spending, and anxious businesses would be even more cautious about investing and hiring.  This could cause a double-dip recession, which would only intensify the nation’s fiscal troubles.  Federal Reserve policymakers are certain to take this into account.  S&P might even downgrade other nations’ sovereign debt, since the U.S. government provides vital support to the entire global financial system. This could increase borrowing costs for homebuyers seeking mortgages and businesses that want to expand.  The impact on lending rates would be small, a few basis points at most.  Financial markets should be able to weather the S&P downgrade, with little lasting economic impact.  “Fundamentally the United States does not deserve a downgrade, because policymakers have made significant strides toward fiscal responsibility.  The debt-ceiling deal was a vital step that doesn’t solve the nation’s problems, but it goes more than halfway,” Zandi said.

One idea that Zandi has to stimulate the economy is to take back unspent dollars from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) and spend it on projects or on short-term stimuli like food stamps.  This is easier said than done and might create more problems than it fixes.  “It’s meaningful, but it’s not a game-changer,” Zandi said.  “From an economic and political perspective, I’m not sure that would make a lot of sense to do.  A lot of this spending has generated a lot of planning, a lot of environmental designs.  They’re counting on the money. If you’re going to divert it, you’re going to create all kinds of problems for them.”

Warren Buffet Bullish on U.S. Credit Rating

Monday, August 22nd, 2011

Standard & Poor’s may have downgraded the United States credit rating from AAA to AA+ and the bears may have taken over Wall Street, but the Berkshire Hathaway chairman and billionaire Warren Buffett believes that the nation deserves a AAAA rating.

In a recent appearance on CNBC, Buffett said that he still believes that the United States’ debt is AAA and that he’s not changing his mind about Treasuries based on Standard & Poor’s downgrade.  “If anything, it may change my opinion on S&P,” according to the Oracle of Omaha.  “I wouldn’t dream of putting it anywhere else,” Buffett said, noting that at Berkshire, the only reason he’s sold Treasuries in the past is to purchase stocks or make acquisitions.  Berkshire is still buying T-bills, even though yields have declined.  “If I have to buy (Treasuries) at a zero percent yield, I will,” he said.  “I don’t like it, but we’ll do it.”

Buffett has something of a vested interest in criticizing Standard & Poor’s.  Berkshire Hathaway is one of the biggest shareholders in Standard & Poor’s main competitor Moody’s with about 28 million shares. But the billionaire has long urged people to make their own decisions about an investment’s prospects without relying on credit rating agencies.  Buffett said the action doesn’t change his view on the soundness of U.S. Treasury bills.  At least $40 billion of Berkshire Hathaway’s approximately $48 billion cash and equivalents is in U.S. Treasury bills, and Buffett won’t consider investing it elsewhere.

According to Buffett, America’s leaders may have a difficult time agreeing on the country’s financial future and the value of the dollar may slide, but that won’t keep the world’s richest nation from paying its debts.  The United States has a GDP of about $48,000 per person, and the Federal Reserve can always print more money.  “Our currency is not AAA, and in recent months the performance of our government has not been AAA, but our debt is AAA,” Buffett said.

Writing on the website, Jeff Reeves says that “Before you scoff that Buffett is just a bygone relic of an era during which stocks like General Electric truly did have bulletproof dividends and it would have been unfathomable for stocks like General Motors to go bankrupt, consider this: In September 2008, the depths of the financial crisis when nobody knew which bank would fail next, Buffett and Berkshire dumped $5 billion into preferred stock of Goldman Sachs.  Thanks to the 10 percent interest on those shares, Berkshire Hathaway earned a cool $500 million per year in dividends before Goldman bought back the stock several months ago.  What’s more, the investment bank paid a hefty 10 percent premium to buy back those preferred shares.  Maybe it was crazy to jump into banks headfirst when the market was going haywire in 2008.  But it was awfully profitable for Buffett.  You might think it’s crazy to stick to your buy-and-hold strategy now, or to continue to rely on U.S. Treasury Bonds.  But take a deep breath and remember that not everyone is screaming and running for the hills.  Yes, persistent problems with unemployment, the political bickering in Congress and the flatlining of our American economy are serious issues.  But they are hardly new.”

Not everyone agrees with Buffett.  According to the Equity Master website, “We must say that we do not agree with Mr. Buffett.  We are not arguing with the credibility of S&P, whose reputation admittedly became tainted when it gave the highest rating to many mortgaged backed securities in the months leading up to the demise of Lehman.  But that does not mean that the U.S. is without some serious problems.  Indeed, the U.S.’ mounting debt is a huge cause for concern and the government’s latest move to raise the debt ceiling is only likely to postpone an eventual default and not entirely extinguish it.  Moreover, the claim that the U.S. can pay its debt because it can print more money is a dangerous one to make.  Printing money never really solved America’s problems.  The two big quantitative easing programs and their failure to revive the sagging U.S. economy is testimonial to the fact.  One thing that it will certainly do is bring down the value of the dollar and cause inflation to accelerate posing a fresh set of problems for the U.S.  So, while criticisms can be piled on S&P, downgrading of the U.S.’ credit rating is something that the world’s largest economy had a long time coming.”

Firstpost agrees that Buffett is wrong.  “Among other things, he said that the U.S. deserved a AAA credit rating when the S&P decided to bring it down to AA+. He also believes the U.S. will avert a double-dip recession.  Well, Mr. Buffett, you are already half-wrong. A slow-growing nation with a 100 percent debt-to-GDP ratio cannot be AAA by any stretch of economic logic.  It makes India’s 70-72 percent debt-GDP ratio look like the epitome of prudence.  As for the other half of your prediction – that the U.S. will avoid a double-dip recession – the jury is out on that one, but the recession wasn’t the reason for the S&P downgrade anyway.  There are two reasons, or maybe three, why the U.S. is in a mess.  One is that it is overleveraged – in deep debt – both at the level of government and the common people.  Two, the law that the U.S. can indefinitely live beyond its means has a flaw.  It was built on the assumption that dollar debts can be paid off by printing more of the green stuff forever.”